Devotional Readings, M'Cheyne Bible Reading Notes

Proverbs 31 – The Perfect Wife

The Book of Proverbs ends on this high note, with the words of the king, or rather his mother, and detail description of the virtuous wife. What man would not desire such a help meet.

Genesis 2:18  And the LORD God said, It is not good that the man should be alone; I will make him an help meet for him.

Click the link for Max McLean reading the chapter.

Pro 31:1  The words of king Lemuel, the prophecy that his mother taught him.

Pro 31:2  What, my son? and what, the son of my womb? and what, the son of my vows?

Pro 31:3  Give not thy strength unto women, nor thy ways to that which destroyeth kings.

Pro 31:4  It is not for kings, O Lemuel, it is not for kings to drink wine; nor for princes strong drink:

Pro 31:5  Lest they drink, and forget the law, and pervert the judgment of any of the afflicted.

Pro 31:6  Give strong drink unto him that is ready to perish, and wine unto those that be of heavy hearts.

Pro 31:7  Let him drink, and forget his poverty, and remember his misery no more.

Pro 31:8  Open thy mouth for the dumb in the cause of all such as are appointed to destruction.

Pro 31:9  Open thy mouth, judge righteously, and plead the cause of the poor and needy.

Pro 31:10  Who can find a virtuous woman? for her price is far above rubies.

Pro 31:11  The heart of her husband doth safely trust in her, so that he shall have no need of spoil.

Pro 31:12  She will do him good and not evil all the days of her life.

Pro 31:13  She seeketh wool, and flax, and worketh willingly with her hands.

Pro 31:14  She is like the merchants’ ships; she bringeth her food from afar.

Pro 31:15  She riseth also while it is yet night, and giveth meat to her household, and a portion to her maidens.

Pro 31:16  She considereth a field, and buyeth it: with the fruit of her hands she planteth a vineyard.

Pro 31:17  She girdeth her loins with strength, and strengtheneth her arms.

Pro 31:18  She perceiveth that her merchandise is good: her candle goeth not out by night.

Pro 31:19  She layeth her hands to the spindle, and her hands hold the distaff.

Pro 31:20  She stretcheth out her hand to the poor; yea, she reacheth forth her hands to the needy.

Pro 31:21  She is not afraid of the snow for her household: for all her household are clothed with scarlet.

Pro 31:22  She maketh herself coverings of tapestry; her clothing is silk and purple.

Pro 31:23  Her husband is known in the gates, when he sitteth among the elders of the land.

Pro 31:24  She maketh fine linen, and selleth it; and delivereth girdles unto the merchant.

Pro 31:25  Strength and honour are her clothing; and she shall rejoice in time to come.

Pro 31:26  She openeth her mouth with wisdom; and in her tongue is the law of kindness.

Pro 31:27  She looketh well to the ways of her household, and eateth not the bread of idleness.

Pro 31:28  Her children arise up, and call her blessed; her husband also, and he praiseth her.

Pro 31:29  Many daughters have done virtuously, but thou excellest them all.

Pro 31:30  Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman that feareth the LORD, she shall be praised.

Pro 31:31  Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her in the gates.

BTW…Interesting comments by Gill and Henry on just who this King was.

The words of King Lemuel,…. Not what were spoken by him, but what were spoken to him; or declaring what his mother said, as what follows shows; of this king we have no account elsewhere under this name. Grotius thinks that King Hezekiah, whose mother Abijah, the daughter of Zechariah, whom he supposes to be a wise man, from whom she had learned much, instructed her son in the following manner; but gives no other reason for this conjecture but that this chapter follows the collection of proverbs made by the men of Hezekiah; but they are expressly said to be Solomon’s, and the words of Agur more immediately follow them; and besides Hezekiah does not appear ever to be addicted to the vices this prince was; much more probable is the conjecture of Bishop Patrick, that he was a prince of another country, perhaps in Chaldea, since a Chaldee word is three times used in his mother’s address to him, and another word in a Chaldee termination; and he supposes his mother to be a Jewish lady, that taught her son the lessons herein contained. But the general sense of Jewish and Christian writers is, that Solomon himself is meant; whose name Lemuel is either a corruption of his name Solomon, a fond pretty name his mother Bathsheba gave him when young, and he thought fit to write it just as his mother spoke it; as mothers often do give such broken names to their children in fond affection to them: or it was another name of his, as it appears he had more than one; it signifies “to God”, one that was devoted to him, as he was by his parents and by himself; or one that belonged to God, was his, as Solomon was; he was beloved of God, and therefore called Jedidiah, 2Sa 12:24; one to whom God was a father, and he a son to him; and he was chosen and appointed by him to succeed his father David in the kingdom, 2Sa 7:13. Hillerus (a) makes the word to signify “over against God”, or “before the face of the first”, or of God and was a type of the “angel of faces”, or of God’s presence, Isa 63:9; Gill

Most interpreters are of opinion that Lemuel is Solomon; the name signifies one that is for God, or devoted to God; and so it agrees well enough with that honourable name which, by divine appointment, was given to Solomon (2Sa 12:25), Jedediahbeloved of the Lord. Lemuel is supposed to be a pretty, fond, endearing name, by which his mother used to call him; and so much did he value himself upon the interest he had in his mother’s affections that he was not ashamed to call himself by it. One would the rather incline to think it is Solomon that here tells us what his mother taught him because he tells us (Pro 4:4) what his father taught him. But some think (and the conjecture is not improbable) that Lemuel was a prince of some neighbouring country, whose mother was a daughter of Israel, perhaps of the house of David, and taught him these good lessons. Note, 1. It is the duty of mothers, as well as fathers, to teach their children what is good, that they may do it, and what is evil, that they may avoid it; when they are young and tender they are most under the mother’s eye, and she has then an opportunity of moulding and fashioning their minds well, which she ought not to let slip. 2. Even kings must be catechised; the greatest of men is less than the least of the ordinances of God. 3. Those that have grown up to maturity should often call to mind, and make mention of, the good instructions they received when they were children, for their own admonition, the edification of others, and the honour of those who were the guides of their youth. Henry

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s